I love my new Puppy

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July 10, 2017

By: Maree Edwards

Eukanuba Resources

If your puppy is a large or giant breed, he will have a very steep growth curve and his nutritional needs can change dramatically over short periods of time. 

Ideally he should be weighed and evaluated at least once every 2 weeks to ensure he is growing at an appropriate rate.

Controlled feeding of a special large breed puppy diet, which contains reduced amounts of energy and calcium compared to small breed puppy food, can help control growth rate. This will help avoid the problems caused by excess weight and developmental bone problems.

As people realize how accessible dog agility is and how addictive the challenges are for both dogs and humans, the sport has taken off. Ace Russell, owner of Agility Center of East Tennessee and inventor of Way to Weave, a weave pole manufacturer, attests to how compelling agility is for both handlers and canines. He came to the sport after showing dogs in conformation for years and was immediately hooked.

Russell helped sponsor the first agility trial in East Tennessee and, over the course of a few years, became an instructor. He now serves as the training director for the Tennessee Valley Kennel Club. “The nice aspect of agility is that it is relatively easy to get involved,” says Russell. “The commitment of time and money can vary based on the passion of the competitors.”

 

 

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July 10, 2017

By: Zachary Davis

Money can buy you a fine dog, but only love can make him wag his tail. —  "some really smart person"

Me and My Dog

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May 01, 2017

By: Zachary Davis

If you love your dog and you love to kayak or canoe, you might want to try bringing your dog out in the boat with you. Before you do, though, you should take precautions to ensure your dog doesn’t get injured or become uncomfortable.

If you love your dog and you love to kayak or canoe, you might want to try bringing your dog out in the boat with you. Before you do, though, you should take precautions to ensure your dog doesn’t get injured or become uncomfortable.

Before I began bringing my Beagle mix, Katie, out with me, I did a lot of research to make sure I was doing it safely. These are the things I found to be most important to keep your dog safe while canoeing.

Help Your Dog Adjust to the Canoe or Kayak

First consider your dog’s temperament and personality. Not every dog likes the water, and some dogs are afraid of it. I’d definitely start by taking your dog to a lake or river just to test the waters, so to speak, and see if he’s interested in it.

Then get your dog used to your boat. Canoes and kayaks make a lot of noise, so you just want your dog to get used to the different sounds yours makes and the motion of the paddle. It’s a good idea to do a slow introduction.

Also consider your dog’s size in relation to the boat. Canoes are wider and have some space to move around, but kayak cockpits are smaller and just designed for one.

I live in a condo, so I store my boat behind the couch. Before we went out on the water, I’d take my kayak out and stick it in the middle of the room, just as a way to get Katie accustomed to it. I would sit in the cockpit and invite her in, but I wasn’t going to force her. Soon, she was sitting in my lap in the kayak’s cockpit. Eventually, I gently pushed her out of my lap in the boat, and she would just sit in front of me.

Beyond the Canoe and Kayak: Your Dog’s Equipment Checklist

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